The exchange through song.

In addition to sharing food , I had the privilege to share song and music with my students. What an experience! Madam Ogwetta, my Ugandan partner teacher in English, started it all when she asked me to sing the first day I met her S4 girls.  Djore, I’m sorry but I could not remember a single thing from the Gospel Choir. Please don’t kick me out. I finally thought of Gabi Gabi, a South African praise and protest song. This became our signature tune. I also taught them Uyai Mose and I Need You. Then I attempted to teach them Wanting Memories and You Brought the Sunshine but there was not enough time and  I had to make sure I was teaching Drama and English, the subjects I was there to teach. My song ministry continued when I told Sister Dinah, one of the Nuns, about the song with her name in it. She asked me to teach it to students and I doubt you have heard a better version of Someone’s in the Kitchen with Dinah. I rounded out the song instruction with an attempt to teach the Peace Club Mark Miller’s Make Me An Instrument (the slow version) but we just didn’t have the time. As my last week approached, I reminded the girls that they had not taught me a single song. They taught me Nimaro, Unless a Man, Let the Redeemed of the Lord Say So, and a song that I don’t know the name of but that was one of my favorites. On my last day with the students, I realized I really didn’t know the songs they taught me and I was hoping to teach Nimaro to the Marble Collegiate Gospel Choir. I was beginning to miss them and I hadn’t left yet. I just couln’t leave without their voices recorded but time was running out. I had to go pack, so , out of desperation, I left my camera with Ajum Simon, a partner teacher with Dana Plotkin, an American Teacher Exchange colleague. He said he couldn’t promise me but that he would try to record the S4s singing the songs they taught me. He and the girls graciously recorded the songs for me. I have included the video of their session. I know you will enjoy these voices as much as I did. Listen to the entire thing because the girls repeated some songs so that I could teach them to the Gospel Choir.  That way you will hear all the songs. Well, that’s all folks!

Laker Runita

 

The Songs

I was not sure of all the lyrics for this South African praise song. I also was not sure how to pronounce the words correctly. I taught the song anyway and it became our anthem.

Gabi Gabi                                                                               

Gabi Gabi

Bash a bal sa wan

Gabi Gabi

Bash a bal sa wan

He frees all the captives

And gives the hungry bread.

He frees all the captives

And gives the hungry bread

God Almighty!

Liberator Lord

God Almighty!

Liberator Lord

Repeat He frees, then back to Gabi Gabi

 

Uyai  Mose   

Uyai  Mose                             

Tene mate mwari

Uyai Mose

Tene mate mwari

Uyai Mose

Tene mate mwari

 

Uya Mose Sweno.

 

Come all you people

Come and praise your maker

Come all you people

Come and praise your maker

Come all you people

Come and praise your maker

Come now and worship the Lord.

 

Someone’s in the Kitchen with Dinah (My version)

 Someone’s in the kitchen with Dinah

Someone’s in the kitchen I know o o o.

Someone’s in the kitchen with Dinah

Cookin’ the food just right!

Mary Kay’s version

 The same as above except change cookin the food just right to strummin’ on the ole banjo!

The Ugandan Songs

I saved the best for last. Here are the songs they taught me.

 

Nimaro

Nimaro pa Lubonga pe lokee…

I komwa

Dong wa maro en  (repeat melody)

Pi maa mereee….

I komwa

 

Dong polo ki ngom dong opong

Ki deyo mereeeeeeeee (x2)

 

Deyo, Deyo Obed bot Rwot

Deyo Alleluia  (repeat several times)

 

Glory Glory be to God, Glory Alleluia

Unless a Man

 

Unless a man- a man is

Born again (echo)

He will never enter into the Kingdom of God (2xs)

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Published in: on August 17, 2009 at 4:29 am  Leave a Comment  

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